Home > General > Uncertainty crippling Industry

Uncertainty crippling Industry

Protests this week in Zimbabwe’s capital saw small Nigerian-owned shops looted by President Robert Mugabe’s loyalists, who say their demonstrations
were in support of so-called indigenization laws. Politicians and economists say the uncertainty about the laws is harming Zimbabwe’s slow economic recovery.

A year ago, new laws were published that said all companies valued at more than $500,000 must surrender a 51-percent share to black Zimbabweans.
This sent shock waves through the business community at a time when many were trying to revive the economy shattered by the former ZANU-PF
government. “There is a law providing for a framework for indigenization, that law leaves a lot to be desired in many areas, particularly in terms of clarity and fairness, [but] unless and until it is changed, it is the law,” Ncube said. He says the wording within the legislation allows for some flexibility and discretion within the indigenization law. “Remember it is not a directory law, it is an aspirational law,” he added. “It says we shall aspire to have such and such percentage of ownership in companies in Zimbabwe. It does not say we shall have, it says ‘we shall aspire,’ which the government shall endeavour to achieve XYZ.”

Earlier this month, a Mauritius company, Essar Africa, took over 55 percent of Zimbabwe’s only iron and steel company, ZISCO, which was previously
state-owned and went bankrupt under the former ZANU-PF government. Ncube said flexibility in the indigenization law allowed a foreign company a
majority shareholding of ZISCO. “For us, what is important is to bring ZISCO back into line and for it to contribute to the economy of the country, and not to quibble about six-percent difference in equity,” said Ncube.

Ncube says the uncertainty of the indigenization laws has frightened off many foreign-owned companies from recapitalizing aging factories, such as
the only vehicle tire manufacturer, Dunlop, based in Bulawayo. “There are many, many companies whose foreign shareholders were about to put
more money in them, say a company such as Dunlop,  and they immediately put on hold some of those plans.
While Zimbabwe previously manufactured much of what it consumed, most retail goods are now imported from South Africa.Most foreign companies in Zimbabwe are South African-owned.

Peta Thornycroft | Johannesburg  February 08, 2011

About these ads
Categories: General
  1. No comments yet.
  1. No trackbacks yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Zimdev

Don't ask what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country.

Barbed Hope

"If you are silent about your pain, they’ll kill you and say you enjoyed it."

critical logistics

thinking about the technopolitics of global logistics

An Ordinary Chick Doing Extraordinary Travelling

OISE Bristol

Creating connections in English

I'm not weird, I'm just a limited edition!

Welcome to the Republic of Sunshyne. A state dedicated to the pursuit of awesomeness!

What Happened to the Portcullis?

An independent view on developments affecting Customs & Trade in sub-Saharan Africa

usgreencardlottery123

Just another WordPress.com site

Weekly Photo Challenge

I do Book Reviews ♥ FIND ME HERE: http://getreadingnow.org

Don't ask what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 318 other followers

%d bloggers like this: