Home > General > Doctors making money in Zimbabwe. Where is the compassion?

Doctors making money in Zimbabwe. Where is the compassion?

I went to see the doctor the other day because I had a little stomach ache and what was initially just a routine check up ended up with me booked into the hospital for a minor operation, much to my horror. The doctor wanted to investigate what was wrong, so she was going to put a telescope inside my stomach or something really scary like that. I agreed to go, but wondered, gees, she hasn’t even tried prescribing something but she wants to open me up, strange. It turns out the procedure was going to cost in excess $2000 in cash, so I concluded that the procedure should really be done as a last resort. So I cancelled the procedure. When I called to cancel and told him why I was cancelling, he told me, how could I get advice from non medical people. “Is your husband a doctor he asked me, so why do you listen to him?”, he asked me. Well thats simple, my husband definitely has my best interests at heart. Interesting enough, he was able to prescribel medication after my refusal to go to surgery. Need I say that I haven’t had a problem since.
While discussing with others I realized that we had all encountered similar situations, with doctors pressurizing patients to have operations that were not really necessary. I realized that Zimbabwean doctors have totally thrown their ethics outside the window and are practicing just to make money. If professionals can do unscrupulous things to get money, where are we going?
During Zimbabwe’s great recession of 2008 I heard a sad story about a little boy who fell onto a steak knife while having dinner with his parents. The knife lodged itself into his face and refused to come out. The parents rushed him to the emergency rooms and were told to bring cash upfront. They went to several hospitals before eventually a compassionate, white doctor took pity on them. By this time he had lost a lot of blood and unfortunately lost his life. I guess doctors and nurses are surrounded by death all day long and have become calloused and cannot feel the pain of death. Certainly they could have seen this little boy on compassionate grounds as the last doctor had done. Surely there is no time to go looking for cash while your son has a knife lodged in his face. How can you turn away a little child with a knife sticking in front of his face and call yourself a doctor?

Another friend had her mother admitted into hospital a few weeks a go and after spending several days in hospital without seeing a doctor, they enquired about where the doctors were. They were told they had to pay the doctor $100 each day for doctors to monitor their mother above the normal hospital bill. Without paying this money daily, the doctors just do their rounds each day while ignoring the patients who have not paid. Mind you these doctors are on a salary, but want a further stipend from the patient before they start doing what they are actually paid for. Imagine how much money each doctor makes for doing his regular rounds.
I remember a great outcry in South Africa when a mother gave birth to a baby outside the clinic. The nurses had told her to go to a maternity facility yet she was already at an advanced stage of labour. She gave birth on the pavement with the help of passers by. The Minister of health, the clinic, nurses and management of the clinic were called in to give an account of what had happened and an enquiry was opened. Needless to say that heads rolled. In Zimbabwe, there is no recourse, nowhere to turn to and no one to listen to you. The medical profession is all about money and if you don’t have any, you will die on the floor of a hospital.
I am sure medical ethics do not work like this. As an aviator one of the first things I learnt was the airman’s creed that spelt out that I was responsible for the lives of those who flew in the aircraft I had worked on. In aviation a saying goes, “Doctors hide their mistakes in the ground, aviators throw them into deep space.”
Life is not really about how much you know or how learned or accomplished you are, at the end of the day, people only want to know how much you care. If you are employed to do a certain job, it is your duty to do it and not to punish the patients because you feel that you are under paid. Volunteer doctors from the West work in rural areas, using their own savings to pay for their upkeep. They work because that is their call in life. Our own doctors can watch as patients die without flinching an eyelid, because their call in life is to MAKE MONEY!

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Categories: General
  1. edwin oloo
    November 28, 2011 at 2:39 pm

    I assume that you are an aviator. How many times have you carried non paying passengers, where you have had to fuel and run the plane with your own money? You have mentionned volunteer doctors from the west. Do you know how much they earn ‘back home’? If your doctor in Zimbabwe earned as much, dont you think he would do a much better job? What kind of facilities do they have? do you care to know whether that doctor has earned his salary for the past several months or not? do you think the drive to save other’s lives is easy on an empty stomach? I support those doctors, let people pay for their healthcare, whoever said healthcare is cheap or free.

    • November 28, 2011 at 8:52 pm

      Maybe I watched too much doctor Quinn. My experience with Zimbabwean doctors has left a bitter taste in my mouth. Even if your salary is low, professionals should be ethical in their dealings. Shall we steal because salaries are not high enough. Do we lower our standards because salaries are not high enough. Shall we rob our clients because we need to make a living. In aviation terms, if a passenger in Capetown wants to go to Harare, do I first fly them to Dubai before taking them to Harare, and then charge them a fare for Capetown-Dubai-Dubai-Harare. Isn’t that a total rip off. If I am a passenger, I want the shortest and cheapest route. Shall we take advantage of the fact that the passenger doesn’t know how to get to Harare. Doctors should be trustworthy, they should first be thining about the welfare of the patient and not how much this procedure is going to affect their bank balance.

      • handinyarari
        March 24, 2014 at 4:08 pm

        You have demonstrated utter folly.It’s like you are trying to compare a whale to a chicken.C’mon where is the logic here ??

      • April 4, 2014 at 1:34 pm

        Handinyari, please note that this post is more than three years old???? It was relevant then. The situation has improved, I must admit.

      • July 29, 2015 at 8:25 pm

        if u spent 7 years studying to be paid peanuts,human lives are expendable

      • August 26, 2015 at 11:14 am

        These are the kind of attitudes that got Zimbabwe where it is today!

    • teerose
      December 5, 2012 at 10:02 pm

      Mr edwin u r very sad story….I can’t biliv u r actually takin the side of the doctors hu went in the medical field not do their job….in aviation ther r no lives involved…..boy lost his life for cryin outl loud pliz tink b4 scribble such nonsense

      • December 18, 2012 at 12:19 pm

        u hope you never get treated by a doctor like him.

    • mzi
      January 7, 2013 at 1:00 pm

      i agree with you edwin, healthcare is a business as well, and should be treated like one

      • January 7, 2013 at 4:22 pm

        I also agree. A business which should have lots of ethics. Its not like we are saying doctors should charge patients, I am saying ,they must provide value for money and not overprice their product. Then we are going to go into the whole supply and demand thing. You can’t tell me you should have to pay an arm and a leg literally just to see a doctor.

  2. edwin oloo
    November 28, 2011 at 2:40 pm

    one more thing.. your doctor was prudent enough to request for an endoscopy. You never know what would have been found.. perhaps cancer.

    • November 28, 2011 at 8:55 pm

      I do not contend with the doctor, I am not qualified to diagnose health problems, but if you had a headache, you wouldn’t open up the skull would you. I am sure, you would try water, rest, pain killers before going to look for a tumor.

  3. beki
    January 30, 2012 at 2:30 pm

    well this is certainly an interesting argument ,but its a bit one sided from the author of the story. I believe Zim doctors are human and how painful it is for one to endure 5 years in a crowded medical school without optimum resources only to start working to get a salary that is lower than an individual sweeping streets for the town council on normal scenario at times not eve getting those few cents. Did you know that Zim doctors are among the least paid in the world yet they are welcomed anywhere in the world for thier competency. On average they earn 7times less than thier SADC counterparts for general doctors. I speak as a brother to a junior doctor here in Zim. Lets not take advantage of our doctors expect them to work on an empty and then deliver without frustration creeping on them. We bred our problems when we thought we can take advantage of them..its time we recognise them for the professionals they are and give them a decent salary and workplace environment and stop pointing fingers.

    • February 3, 2012 at 10:24 am

      Hi Beki, Thanks for the comment. You are certainly right, my argument may have been a bit one sided. But doctors aren’t the only poorly paid professionals in Zimbabwe. Look at our teachers, yes they may not have degrees and spent five years training, but if it wasn’t for those teachers, those doctors wouldn’t be there. Every professional deserves a decent salary in Zimbabwe, not just doctors. Many workers are going for months without pay, at least doctors actually get a pay cheque at the end of the month. My point is, if the money in Zimbabwe is not good for doctors, then they should look for greener pastures. Should we watch while doctors operate people unnecessarily, call for all sorts of scans and treatments unnecessarily. I know it is not all doctors who do this, but my experience is I’d rather see a doctor outside Zimbabwe, because they see me as a patient not a money making opportunity. I’m just calling for doctors to be ethical and to put their patients first. Doctors in SA and the regions also strike for more pay, but they don’t use devious methods to get money out of patients pockets.

      • jae
        August 29, 2012 at 2:04 pm

        don’t compare teachers to doctors,if my memory serves me well this article is you complaining about doctors..it is true that all professionals arent getting the money they deserve,don’t victimize you are not a doctor

      • August 30, 2012 at 2:04 pm

        The comment read: What about all the nurses, teachers, lecturers, soldiers, engineers, etc who spend years studying. Should they also lower their standards and shall we just keep quiet as standards go down just becuase they went to med school?
        Point being. If teachers taught your children half a syllabus because they were not getting paid enough we’d be mad and this has happened, and is WRONG! Two wrongs don’t make a right.

      • August 30, 2012 at 2:08 pm

        There is an old aviation joke. I think it is so right. It says doctors bury their mistakes, aviators send them into the air! If an air traffic controller decided to be sloppy coz of money issues, there would be countless deaths. If engineers decided not to do a good job, planes would fall everyday. Imagine if Air Zim engineers had taken on a bad attitude, all AZ planes would have fallen from the sky. Point being, other professions continue to work with integrity even when they are not being paid enough with little equipment and resources.

  4. T.flame
    February 24, 2012 at 5:11 pm

    How much does a doctor get a month?

    • drking
      August 2, 2012 at 7:08 pm

      They get just over $500 per month

  5. jae
    March 20, 2012 at 8:58 am

    i believe dev is being very unsensetive.you are in no way qualified to diagnose your own health problem.if you think the doctor was wrong and shou;d have given you pain killers why didnt you just take them yourself @home????people dont appreciate the work doctors do,shame on you!!!5 years in med school to get peanuts,but they still wake up every morning to go to parirenyatwa and have to make do with outdateed equipment and no drugs and resources!!shame on you!!!

    • March 20, 2012 at 10:36 am

      What about all the nurses, teachers, lecturers, soldiers, engineers, etc who spend years studying. Should they also lower their standards and shall we just keep quiet as standards go down just becuase they went to med school?

    • March 20, 2012 at 10:38 am

      Hi Jae, I dont mean to be insensitive. I was just trying to express my frustration as a patient.If a doctor decided to operate on a patient because they were constipated would you not be alarmed. i’m no medical doctor, but if someone is constipated, the first course of action is diet and not going under the knife. Or do you have to go to medical school for that.

  6. drking
    August 2, 2012 at 6:56 pm

    @Zimdev I don’t mean to offend you but clearly you have no clue about medicine and surgery it’s a shame that medical procedures are expensive but you should also value your life. If you think diet could have helped you why didn’t you do it yourself. What you call constipation can be a myriad of pathologies there is a whole section in the medical library just on acute abdomen hundreds of books and you say diet. And the person who saw you did not just spend 5 years first of all they worked hard to get 14/15 points and get into med school, they had to sacrifice part of their life and endure the complexity of 5 years of training undergo 2 years assessment as a JRMO spend 1 year in the rural attachment come back to school spend a minimum of 4 years training for a Masters in medicine finally they start to work and they are not appreciated by people like you. You think they spend all those years just for u to pop some prescription pills whenever you like . You could die from an acute abdomen and it is not treated by drugs it needs the gifted hands of a surgeon who underwent rigorous training in harsh conditions

    • August 6, 2012 at 11:20 am

      @drkn You will never convince me to go for surgery before trying ALL OTHER MEANS POSSIBLE! That is what I would have hoped my doctor would advise. Unfortunately, having experienced medicine in other countries, what I have seen, observed and experienced in Zimbabwe leaves a bitter taste in my mouth. I understand that the training is rigorous, but talk to NHS doctors and see if they are happy with their salaries. Try the SA doctors who strike now and again. The only difference with doctors in other countries, is EVEN THOUGH THEIR PAY CHEQUE IS LOW, THEY STILL KEEP THE WELFARE OF THEIR PATIENTS A PRIORITY INSTEAD OF THEIR POCKETS!

  7. jae
    August 29, 2012 at 2:01 pm

    i would appreciate it if you could do a follow up to this email apologizing for your article zimdev< you are very well misinformed

    • August 30, 2012 at 1:48 pm

      In Zimbabwe you have to apologise to doctors who fail to do their jobs. In other countries those doctors are prosecuted!!

      I’m sorry, I’m not gonna apologise, that is my experience with Zim doctors, should I aplogise for my bad experiences. I can tell you a hundred and one of them. I’m even going through one right now. My family is having to send one of our sekuru’s out of the country for a hip and bone replacement when numerous Zim doctors have been treating his knees instead of his hip!!

      My gp, is very good, don’t get me wrong, she’s excellent, but she’s been our family doctor for more than 20 years. There are great doctors out there dont get me wrong, but there are a whole lot of bad greedy ones out there as well. Those are the ones I.m talking about. If you are a great doctor and you do the best in the difficult situation, good for you and thank you!

      You must get a doctor to apologise to me for the bad experiences I’ve had.

    • August 30, 2012 at 1:56 pm

      So which part am I misinformed, the part where my friend was asked to pay US$100 A DAY so a doctor could see her mother. In some countries they would open an enquiry into the fact that doctors are asking for bribes.

  8. jae
    September 3, 2012 at 2:34 pm

    im sorry but i dont think i can continue reading your blog anymore.is this your job????coa if it is i suggest you get a new one.if i wanted to hear an asshole fart i would have just farted!!

  9. September 9, 2012 at 7:36 pm

    Get a grip @Jae, no need to get your underwear in a twist. Thank you for dropping by.

  10. Olusogo
    September 23, 2012 at 12:32 am

    A doctor who feels underpaid and underappreciated should abscond the profession rather than prescribe unnecessarily. Your doc should have taken time to explain clearly what the possibiliuties are re the abdominal pain. Not all abdominal pain is an acute abdomen though. Better to be a street sweeper than a crooked doctor. And I should know. Once a doc strts on the journey down the street of lowered ethical standard, loss of their conscience for the sake of gain quickly follows, and then they are just a whisker away from becoming licensed killers. Unto any to which a patient entrusts their well-being, much is certainly to be expected.

    • September 26, 2012 at 3:39 am

      Finally someone who agrees with me. @ Olusogo, you are the kind of doctor I’d like to visit, not the AJae kind of doctor who thinks its all about money even at the expense of my health. I like two two things you said, better to be stree weeper than a crooked doctor and they are whiskers away from being licensed killers.
      BTW the abdominal pain was definitely not acute, it was mild.

  11. Olusogo
    September 23, 2012 at 12:36 am

    BTW I am interested in doctors job vacancies in Zim. Cant seem to find much online. Wld appreciate any links. Cheerio

    • September 26, 2012 at 3:54 am

      I’m not sure if they advertise. Maybe you’d need to go direct to the hospitals. I’ll try and find out.

  12. October 2, 2012 at 10:39 am

    Great post! Thankyou.

  13. October 3, 2012 at 11:32 pm

    Heya! I’m at work surfing around your blog from my new iphone 3gs! Just wanted to say I love reading through your blog and look forward to all your posts! Carry on the superb work!

  14. October 5, 2012 at 7:02 pm

    Well said. Thank you!

  15. October 11, 2012 at 1:33 am

    You are a very capable person!

  16. teerose
    December 5, 2012 at 10:07 pm

    I am junior doctor n I hope to make a difference…..its funny hw r tryin to liv in denial dut doctors hav buried many they culd hav saved t s very sad…I expirienced the selfish n I swore to mak differnce

    • December 18, 2012 at 12:22 pm

      We need more like you. Wish you all the best.

  17. chanetsa
    December 14, 2012 at 12:54 pm

    not all doctors are bad.corruption too much on some is just too much.Like hear this one in a goverment hospital.patient with a broken limb admitted on a appointed date cold case.Nothing happens for several days, a nurse advises relatives to pay the doctor 2000us if they want operation done.Meanwhile patient is being starved for theater several times nothing happens.When relatives pay patient is taken to theater on a sunday at 3am.The job is done ,result patient wound becomes very septic.It has taken this patient 3+months but not yet recovered.What do you say to this.Is there no medical audit?If not why?I feel they shoud be checks on all doctors ,they should be answerable to someone.

    • December 18, 2012 at 10:59 am

      Gees, if you think it normal for a doctor to request US$2000 from a hospitalised patient to get an operation, then we have a really big problem. Doctors do as they please, they are above the law, so they do as they want. Sad!

  18. mzi
    January 7, 2013 at 12:59 pm

    this is very interesting. the story is 2 sided, of course there are several bad doctors, but it would be wrong to say all zim doctors have become greedy and lost their values for ethics. in fact medicine is a business aswell, and as such should be treated like one.people need to pay for healthcare

  19. gerald kunyanya
    April 6, 2013 at 4:22 am

    I am a Zimbabwean trained doctor now working in Australia as a surgeon. I have worked in Zimbabwe between 2005 and 2009.

    From the information you have written, I assume the doctor wanted to do a laparoscopy on you for acute abdominal pain. This doctor would have been a surgeon. It would imply to me you went to a general practitioner first who then referred you to a general surgeon for abdominal pain which was suggestive of what we call an acute abdomen. No GP would do a laparoscopy on a patient. You would under normal circumstances also not go to a surgeon directly without being referred by a GP.

    Laparoscopy is a fairly common procedure we do here in Australia and the world over for abdominal pain (acute abdomen) especially in younger patients still looking forward to have families where you try to avoid CT scans for they have their risk with radiation on ovaries and testes. it is not uncommon to have negative laparoscopy that is you find nothing wrong and close up. After a few days the pain goes away and you get discharged. What you must also realize is you would have been the first to sue this surgeon if he missed an acute surgical condition such as cholecystitis, appendicitis or bowel cancer.

    You haven’t said much in terms of your symptoms and certainly we do not have information on how the abdominal examination went, as well as blood test results such as a raised white cell count ( which would justify a laparoscopy) to make a call as to weather observation, laparoscopy was the right decision. If as a surgeon I am referred a patient with abdominal pain and certain markers on blood results and not do anything further like a laparoscopy or ct scan and a medicolegal case were to arise, I would be deemed incompetent and failed in my duty of care.

    It is unwise of you to say a doctor should try something other than an operation in every case. While many cases do not require operations there are times where it is the best and logical thing to do depending on the patients’s description of the pain, examination findings and blood tests.

    My qualifications are

    MBChB (UZ),
    MPH (Deakin),
    Fellow of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Surgeons (FRACS)

    • April 9, 2013 at 7:13 am

      Thank you for the comment. Unfortunately for me, I didn’t go through all those consultative stages. I just had one visit to the doctor, no tests, just booke in for surgery It is the cost of the procedure and that irked me, plus thr fact that IS landed with a shortfull of more than 1,500 US dollars. This being so after the doctor told me the ahortfall was going to be US50 dollars.

      But on the other hand, not all doctors in Zim are in it for the money. I have since discovered that the Public Service doctors are quite good. It is also advisable to shop around before seing a doctor, especially specialists.

  20. gerald kunyanya
    April 6, 2013 at 4:43 am

    I am a Zimbabwean trained doctor now working in Australia as a surgeon. I have worked in Zimbabwe between 2005 and 2009.

    From the information you have written, I assume the doctor wanted to do a laparoscopy on you for acute abdominal pain. This doctor would have been a surgeon. It would imply to me you went to a general practitioner first who then referred you to a general surgeon for abdominal pain which was suggestive of what we call an acute abdomen. No GP would do a laparoscopy on a patient. You would under normal circumstances also not go to a surgeon directly without being referred by a GP.

    Laparoscopy is a fairly common procedure we do here in Australia and the world over for abdominal pain (acute abdomen) especially in younger patients still looking forward to have families where you try to avoid CT scans for they have their risk with radiation on ovaries and testes. it is not uncommon to have negative laparoscopy that is you find nothing wrong and close up. After a few days the pain goes away and you get discharged. What you must also realize is you would have been the first to sue this surgeon if he missed an acute surgical condition such as cholecystitis, appendicitis or bowel cancer.

    You haven’t said much in terms of your symptoms and certainly we do not have information on how the abdominal examination went, as well as blood test results such as a raised white cell count ( which would justify a laparoscopy) to make a call as to weather observation, laparoscopy was the right decision. If as a surgeon I am referred a patient with abdominal pain and certain markers on blood results and not do anything further like a laparoscopy or ct scan and a medicolegal case were to arise, I would be deemed incompetent and failed in my duty of care.

    It is unwise of you to say a doctor should try something other than an operation in every case. While many cases do not require operations there are times where it is the best and logical thing to do depending on the patients’s description of the pain, examination findings and blood tests.

    My qualifications are

    MBChB (UZ),
    MPH (Deakin),
    Fellow of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Surgeons (FRACS)

  21. George
    June 10, 2013 at 4:46 am

    Your comment is awaiting moderation.
    Your comment is awaiting moderation.
    I am a Zimbabwean trained Dr and I am working in Australia. I have worked in Orthopaedics and in general surgery within the last 12 months. Even here too there is a difference between public and private patients. Patients with private health insurance or willing to pay cash upfront get operated on asap compared to public patients who have to wait for up to 12 months for elective surgery (non emergency surgery).
    The main problem I see with people like you (author) is that you think everything Zimbabwean/African is substandard and everything done in the first world is perfect.

    • June 11, 2013 at 10:36 am

      @ George. I do not think that everything done in the West is best, I LIVE IN AFRICA!!! By choice!!! I love Africa. I just think that it is sad that there is not MUCH compassion in medicine in Zimbabwe. I understand waiting lists etc, that is normal, there is always a heavy burden on the medical facilities, so that cannot be helped. What is wrong is for a doctor to demand extra payments from patients who are already paying hospital fees!!!

      Mind you the situation may have changed by now because this post is about two years old!

    • June 11, 2013 at 11:01 am

      For the record, there are some doctors doing great social work. There are doctors providing free medical treatment to patients in Mbare and other high density suburbs. Not all doctors are in it for the people, but there should be a few who are. Great work to these doctors. God Bless you abundantly!!!

      • Physician
        September 1, 2013 at 10:47 am

        Yoyr story lacks logic unfortunately. As specialists we work by referrals. A patient is seen by a GP and the GP gives treatment then if the GP deems it necessary they refer to a specialist. Yhere is no way you can just wind up at the specialist rooms wuthout being referred and without a booking. This is standard pricedure everywhere. I am practising in zim as a specialist but I have also worked in UK and America. The system is the same in terms of referral pattern.

        Supposing your unbelievable sequence of events somehow happened, it is unbelievable that you were goubg to be taken to theatre wihout blood tests. no surgeon would book an elective procedure and carry it out without any blood tests. you never mentioned an anesthetist in your story which is also unbelievable. Whether you were going to have an endoscopy or laparoscopy is also not clear. This too makes your story unbelievable.

        Specialists are expensive in any country, whether South Africa or any country. Remember as specialists most of us would have worked or trained in the countries you seem to be so proud of. we are very familiar with the NHS and uts weaknesses. after all, we have worked in the NHS and most of us are registered with the GMC. we also know that private patients in uk get faster treatment than NHS patients and they pay a lot more. if you google you will see that there are British and American doctors who earn more than £1million pounds per year. Just because you were asked to pay for a service does not make a person unethical. if it were in uk, you would go to the nhs instead of a private consultant.

        There is also an important distinction between a public hospital and a private hospital. if you are admitted into
        a private hospital, you pay the hospital for its use but the specialist who sees you charges you separately. Go to milpark or Morningside hospitals in Sandton, its the same. The doctir bills you and the hospital bills you separately. its not like the nhs which is a public system.

        You go on to say a procedure was not done after you refused to have it then you claim you were asked to pay a shortfall for a procedure that was not done. you must not waste people’s time with illogical posturing.

        In conclusion you seem to have a vendetta against Zimbabwean doctors. it is very unfortunate for you. You have a superiority complex where you think whites and European people are superior. I attend to all races and all social classes and have experience in Zimbabwe and abroad and can tell from your frenzied article that you are a prophetess of doom. You mix private and public care, pretend to be a doctor…who on earth would go for hip replacement therapy ahead of conservative care in the absence of a fracture or severe immobility? You need to stop pretending to be a doctor.

        Before I sign off, after I spent 14 years in training and traversed the globe to be whom I am, dont walk into my specialist clinic with no consultation fees and plead humanity. This is because when you come to a specialist you book through my PA and your GP would have giveb you a referral letter and you would have been told what my consultation fee is. if you cannot affors it, as a consumer you have a right to go elsewhere, including South africa and the NHS!

      • September 2, 2013 at 1:22 pm

        @Physician. All the things you mentioned about, did not happen during the consultation, eg blood tests, which is what gave me reason to doubt the integrity of the medical practioners in Zim. I may have painted everyone with the same brush, but that was because of the bad experiences i have had. You tell me why a doctor would suggest hip replacement therapy ahead of conservative care. We are just people with no medical experience, but even the lay person knows that there is somethning wrong with that picture.

        What I think is that medical doctors in Zimbabwe are well trained, but because there is no medical litigation in Zim, they can simply hide their mistakes in the grave?

      • September 6, 2013 at 2:54 pm

        Doctor, if a child walked into your surgery with a knife sticking in his face and you had no compassion, shame on you! Just your humanity should tug you to act.
        Fortunately, there are some doctors who still have patients at heart, a lot of them do pro bono work. Celebration Church and other organisations are doing great work. We definitely cannot expect every doctor to be in it for the patients, most are in it for the money.

      • Physician
        September 1, 2013 at 11:11 am

        http://www.theguardian.com/society/2000/oct/08/futureofthenhs.nhsstaff in case you dont want to wastw tine on research there is what you dont want to see about the ao called compassionate Britons!

  22. mgcini moyo
    July 23, 2014 at 12:07 pm

    its the origins of the profession.medical practice was never made to be practiced by people from poor backgrounds.like most zim doctors or other similar third world country doctors.from a psychological view any one from a poor background who is a doctor would want to see the practice changing their wealth status satisfactorily ,to say the least its one of most driving motives to persue any profession like medicine etc.however in such an repressive economic environment like Zimbabwe where corruption by political leaders is rampant teaching everyone to follow suit both prof. an d non prof. doctors are not an exception to this national tragedy.
    nevertheless ethics should be upheld in any situation,but the national leaders who do not have ethical respect for doctors of all professions-allowing the poor background doctor to continue in financial misery after their hard eaened degree and day to day sacrifice to render service to the public more like slavery to say the list..they should be embarrassed by their heartless negligence chicanery.offerring them meagre salaries like that.surely doctors and other professional unethical events are symptoms/signs of a gross systemic ethical disorder originationg the the higher top national leaders.
    ethical and good client service delivery is bottom rocketing in Zim across the board not only amoung medical proffessions -banks ,schools,mining,insurance,ect face similar events.

    its to national leaders to step up to change this crippling ideology now affecting the educated people of zim.they must treat their own people like people not slaves who work to support their squandering ,flamboyant,extravagant and discriminative use of Zim economy.

    • July 25, 2014 at 8:35 pm

      Great point. Corruption needs to addressed from the top to the bottom and from the bottom up. It would help if people could make a decent living out of their chosen careers.

  23. forwardnecha@gmai.com
    September 27, 2016 at 3:05 pm

    Hey guys e doctor-patient ratio in zim is very high and that obviously means doctors are too busy for the rest of their life even when they are supposed to rest or sleep they can be called for an emergency.We need to realise that they are not programmable computers without feelings.Noone shud say that they need to donate their skill.they deserve a better pay l feel.

    • November 8, 2016 at 3:55 pm

      I agree with you. But the situation is not true for doctors only. Teachers, nurses, academics and all professionals need fair pay. In the mean time, doctors must be professional and have integrity, like all other professionals. We need to create a middle class where the majority of people can live a normal life, not just doctors.

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